Inversely Proportional

Inversely Proportional

Some time ago I was reading www.caffeinatedcoder.com/book-review-the-c-programming-la…

[…] Since a good portion of the C# books are between the 500 and 1000 page range, it was refreshing to read a book that was less than 200 pages. Partly this is because when the book was published the surface area of the reusable API was a small fraction of what it is now. However, I also wonder if there was an expectation of disciplined conciseness in technical writing back in the late 80’s that simply no longer exists today. […]

I think this is a very important point. But then, again, it was no secret – this was written in the Preface to the first edition of that book:

[…] is not a "very high level" language, nor a "big" one, and is not specialized to any particular area of application. But its absence of resrictions and its generality make it more convenient and effective for many tasks than supposedly more powerful languages. […]

I think it all boils down to simplicity, as Glenn Scott says in glennsc.com/start-a-revolution-with-confident-simplicity

[…] To master this technique you need to adopt this mindset that your product is, say, simple and clean, and you just know this, and you are confident and assured of this. There is no urgent need to “prove” anything. […]

Another similar book on a (different) programming language, is "Programming Ruby, the pragmatic programmer's guide" which starts with

[…] This book is a tutorial and reference for the Ruby programming language. Use Ruby, and you'll write better code, be more productive, and enjoy programming more. […] As Pragmatic Programmers we've tried many, many languages in our search for tools to make our lives easier, for tools to help us do our jobs better. Until now, though, we'd always been frustrated by the languages we were using. […]

Of course that language is simple and sweet, very expressive, and programmers are seen as having to be "pragmatic". No nonsensical, incredibly complex cathedrals (in the language itself and in the documentation) – but quick and dirty things that just WORK.

But way too often, the size of a book is considered a measure for its quality and depth.
I recently read on Twitter about an upcoming "Programming Windows Phone 7" book that would be more than a thousand pages in size: twitter.com/#!/MicrosoftPress/status/27374650771

I mean: I do understand that there are many API's to take a look at and the book wants to be comprehensive…but…. do they really think that the sheer *size* of a book (>1000 pages) is an advantage in itself? it might actually scare people away, for how I see things. But it must be me.

In the meantime the book has been released and can be dowloaded from here blogs.msdn.com/b/microsoft_press/archive/2010/10/28/free-…

I have not looked at it yet – when I will have time to take a look at it I'll be able to judge better…

for now I only incidentally noticed that a quick search for books about programming the iPhone/iPad returns books that are between 250 and 500 pages maximum…

And yet simplicity CAN be known to us, and some teams really "Get it": take Powershell, for example – it is a refreshing example of this: the official powershell blog has a subtitle of "changing the world, one line at the time" – that's a strong statement… but in line with the empowerment that simplicity enables. In fact, Bruce Payette's book "Powershell in Action" is also not huge.
I suppose it must be a coincidence. Or maybe not.




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