Monitoring Syslog with OpsMgr 2007

I had missed it… finally guidance on how to collect and monitor UNIX syslog in System Center Operations Manager 2007 has been published!

This is much more sysadmin-oriented than what was availble before (that remais of course still relevant, but more from a Management Pack developer’s point of view, who wants to know how things work “behind the hood”).

Live Photo Gallery and Flickr

I actually read this (Live Photo Gallery  allowing you to post to Flickr) a couple of days ago in an internal mail, and – even tough I Love Flickr – I have been extremely quiet and cautious and I did not blog about it. In fact I felt like waiting about blogging this GREAT new, because I thought that it was internal-only, confidential information, and I was worried that someone would tell me off 🙁

In the end it turns out that I did not have to wait or be worried, since the cat was already out of the bag!!!

[As a side note, it happens a lot of times that stuff gets public much earlier than when I actually read that internally. In those internal communication it very often is still considered “confidential” when the whole world is speaking about it…. I don’t get this whole “confidentiality” thing in these days of porous membranes…]

.Net Framework CODE is going to be available!

I am amazed and excited to read that Microsoft has decided to release the source code of the .Net libraries.

Scott Guthrie writes:

“[…] One of the things my team has been working to enable has been the ability for .NET developers to download and browse the source code of the .NET Framework libraries, and to easily enable debugging support in them. […] VS 2008 will include support to automatically retrieve the appropriate .NET Framework source files on demand from Microsoft. This means that the source code for the ASP.NET GridView and BaseDataBoundControl classes above do not have to already be installed on the machine before we started the debugger. Instead, when we use F11 to step into their implementation VS can automatically download the source files from Microsoft and open it within the IDE. […]”

WOW. This is so cool, and a further step in the right direction.

Thanks to Alessandro for having picked this up, as I read it on his blog, and I thought it was an information worth spreading!!!

Facebook implemented a user.setStatus API!

Finally, you CAN change your Facebook status programmatically in a way that is supported!

Some months ago Christian discovered a hack to change your Facebook status. Some other people also used it and extended it. I also ported it to C# and made a winform using its unofficial method.
Suddenly after, Facebook asked us to take down the code, as it violated their terms of service.

It has taken a while, some struggles, but now they finally recognized the need for federated status, and implemented a user.setStatus API.

Twitter is the first to pick it up, so now you can update twitter and have your status propagate in Facebook!

Well done, guys!

When I’ll have some time I might think of rewriting my app using the SUPPORTED method, maybe finally writing that Live Messenger plugin… it would be nice 🙂
When I’ll have time…

It’s nice to see things called by their real name

Facebook Terms of Service state that it is forbidden to “[…] use automated scripts to collect information from or otherwise interact with the Service or the Site […]”

For this reason, I had to pull down the code of the small application I had previously released, which was “logging” into the mobile web application “pretending” to be a mobile browser and change your status. Big deal!!!

I am quite sure there are a lot of people writing “official” applications (that is using the “platform API” and so on) that are collecting A LOT of information about users who install their applications. They are being sent the info about the visitors by facebook, they are storing them, they might do whatever they please with (study it, sell it to spammers, to marketers, to making-money-assholes) and nobody will ever notice because it is on their servers and nobody can check that.

But a script that changes your status from remote – since this is not a functionality they CHOSE to expose in their API – then THAT is a big issue. Doh!
It’s just plain ridiculous, but that’s it.

Sure, the terms of service for app developers say a bit more in this regard:

[…]
4) Except as provided in Section 2.A.6 below, you may not continue to use, and must immediately remove from any Facebook Platform Application and any Data Repository in your possession or under your control, any Facebook Properties not explicitly identified as being storable indefinitely in the Facebook Platform Documentation within 24 hours after the time at which you obtained the data, or such other time as Facebook may specify to you from time to time;

5) You may store and use indefinitely any Facebook Properties that are explicitly identified as being storable indefinitely in the Facebook Platform Documentation; provided, however, that except as provided in Section 2.A.6 below, you may not continue to use, and must immediately remove from any Facebook Platform Application and any Data Repository in your possession or under your control, any such Facebook Properties: (a) if Facebook ceases to explicitly identify the same as being storable indefinitely in the Facebook Platform Documentation; (b) upon notice from Facebook (including if we notify you that a particular Facebook User has requested that their information be made inaccessible to that Facebook Platform Application); or (c) upon any termination of this Agreement or of your use of or participation in Facebook Platform;
[…]
You will not directly or indirectly sell, export, re-export, transfer, divert, or otherwise dispose of any Facebook Properties to any country (or national thereof) without obtaining any required prior authorizations from the appropriate government authorities;
[…]

Are we sure everybody is playing by these rules, when every facebook “application” really runs on the developer’server ? How do you know that they are really storing only what you want them to store, and deleting what you want them to delete ? Everybody knows how difficult it is to really “delete” digital content once it has come into existance… who knows how many copies of this database/social graph are floating around ?

Of course that is not an issue because people don’t talk about it enough. But a script that changes your status – now, THAT is a very terrible thing.

I just don’t get this “politically correctness”. It must be me.

Oh, no… look! It’s not only me!
I had read this post of Dare, but I problably had overlooked the last bit of it…. because he did point out this Hypocrisy going on:

[…]
Or (5) the information returned by FQL about a user contains no contact information (no email address, no IM screen names, no telephone numbers, no street address) so it is pretty useless as a way to utilize one’s friends list with applications besides Facebook since there is no way to cross-reference your friends using any personally identifiable association that would exist in another service.

When it comes to contact lists (i.e. the social graph), Facebook is a roach motel. Lots of information about user relationships goes in but there’s no way for users or applications to get it out easily. Whenever an application like FacebookSync comes along which helps users do this, it is quickly shut down for violating their Terms of Use. Hypocrisy? Indeed.
[…]

He then insists in a more recent post in calling things by their name:

[…]
I will point out that 9 times out of 10 when you hear geeks talking about social network portability or similar buzzwords they are really talking about sending people spam because someone they know joined some social networking site. I also wonder how many people realize that these fly-by-night social networking sites that they happily hand over their log-in credentials to so they can spam their friends also share the list of email addresses thus obtained with services that resell to spammers?
[…]
how do you prevent badly behaved applications like Quechup from taking control away from your users? At the end of the day your users might end up thinking you sold their email addresses to spammers when in truth it was the insecure practices of the people who they’d shared their email addresses with that got them in that mess. This is one of the few reasons I can understand why Facebook takes such a hypocritical approach. 🙂
[…]

Thanks, Dare, for mentioning Hypocrisy. Thanks for calling things by their name. I do understand their approach, I just don’t agree with it.

I did pull my small application off the Internet because I have a family to mantain and I don’t want to have legal troubles with Facebook. Sorry to all those that found it handy. No, I cannot even give that to you per email. It’s gone. I am sorry. For the freedom of speech, especially, I am sorry.

I will change my status more often on Twitter.

43things Facebook app

WOW I already have 13 (thirteen) users for my Facebook application showing your goals pulled from 43things!

Sure, gapingvoid has got 700+ users in 3 days, I know. But hey, he’s famous, and I don’t see the point of cluttering my already busy Facebook profile with a cartoon. I do read him and generally like his cartoons, and I am in the “friends of the blue monster” group (so to say I like him).

But I prefer reading him in my “normal” aggregator.

I think Facebook apps should rather “inject social objects” (where did I read this definition? sorry I cant recall it or I would appropiately link to you… I swear).

There are of course other similar applications that just pull comics in your profile (like Dilbert, Garfield, etc) but again – I think this is all stuff that YOU are interested in, and thus should just go into your aggregator – so YOU can read it; on the opposite your profile in Facebook should talk about YOU and things YOU are doing, for example. Occasionally they can be YOUR posts or they can even be someone else’s posts that you read and want to share/let other people see (that’s why I pull in my Google Reader’s shared items for example – things I read and want you too to see). If this includes importing other social objects/information from other social networks, like the music you are listening to on last.FM, or the photos you published on Flickr, then it is fine. That’s why I wrote an app that shows the things you want to do, pulled in from 43things.com and one that shows the places you want to visit pulled in from 43places.com. Because I felt those social objects from another network were missing. In fact a user commented “[…] Glad someone finally took a step forward to create this, though 🙂 […]“.

But of course what I wrote about which kind of applications you should or shouldn’t have in your profile, remember that this is just my personal opinion rant, and everybody is free to put whatever stuff he/she likes onto his/her profile, in the end 🙂

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